Quick Tip: Callbacks

Shout out to my younger brother Bobby who encouraged me to do a video blog this time around! He reads my blog every week and is a big supporter of my career! I’ve only done one other video blog before (In 2016, right before I shot a film and I was sharing my character’s wardrobe with everyone)

Click on the link below to get a quick tip of the day regarding callbacks! (Shout out to the motorcycle gang at the end of the video!)

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Self-Tape Audition Adventures!

Fellow actors! As you probably know by now, self-tape auditions are becoming more and more common. A self-tape audition is where you are responsible for putting yourself on camera for an audition and submitting it to either the casting director or your reps. You are not auditioning in the casting director’s office, but rather, in a place you’ve set up for self-tape auditions: your office or a guest room or a studio room, etc. Self-tape auditions occur for a variety of reasons and I love to do them when the opportunity presents itself.

I had another self-tape audition yesterday (September 9th) for a feature film. I was thrilled with the part I auditioned for and I had a great experience from start to finish.

Looking back at my experience, I’m proud of:

*Being on go from the moment I received the audition notice from my agent. Being on go meaning that I jumped right away into the work and planned out when and how I was going to get my self-tape done.

*Keeping myself open to the audition preparation process (Subtees Process) and honoring my first impressions with good-humored inflexibility.

*Researching previous work that the director and writer of the feature film did to get a sense of their artistic aesthetic.

*Bringing someone else into the audition process that I trust to read the other characters in the scene.

*Me not questioning my choices.

*Setting up my self-tape station and deciding the best time to shoot it.

*Choosing my wardrobe based upon the headshot my agent submitted to casting. Because a headshot only captures the top half of your wardrobe, I used the clues that the writer gave to inform the bottom half of my wardrobe.

*Having a moment before. Having subtext.

*Being a real person in the scene having an experience.

*Shooting the self-tape audition in about 35 minutes. I had two scenes and I did three takes for each scene, plus a take where I slated and a take for my full body shot.

*Looking at the takes and knowing which ones I was going to keep and which ones I was getting rid of. And being able to look at the takes objectively with no emotional attachment. In other words, looking at the takes objectively to see if I was honoring the story being told and that I was also delivering my product. I was very happy with the product I created and that each take was only slightly different from each other. Every take was still in the same zip code.

*Quickly editing the takes and uploading it to Actors Access for my agent to approve and submit to casting on my behalf.

*My agent loving the self-tape audition and writing, “Great job!”

*Me sending a cool and clever tweet to the casting director afterwards to thank them for the audition opportunity.

*Celebrating my win with pepperoni pizza and champagne.

What was the last self-tape audition you had? How did it go? Or what was your most favorite self-tape audition? Let me know in the comments section below!

Auditions

LLL d 31_5418.NEFCasting directors in a scene from “La La Land” / Lionsgate

On Monday, June 5th, I had the honor and privilege of being a reader for a prominent casting director who was casting various roles for a feature film. As the reader, I brought each scheduled actor into the room and read the other characters in the scene they were auditioning for. A reader gives the casting director the opportunity to focus on the actor who’s auditioning, to take notes on them and give re-directs if necessary.

This was my third time being on the other side of the casting desk. The first time was when I was a reader for an AFI short film that was being cast by another prominent casting director. The second time was when I was casting for my own TV pilot. With this project, I read the entire script for context and I rehearsed the scenes I was in so that I could impinge and affect the actors when they read with me.

Being a reader this past Monday was a great confirmation and reminder of things I already understood about the casting process and I wanted to share it with you all:

1) Don’t take it personal if you don’t get the job. There are so many reasons why you don’t get the job. Reasons that are out of your control. This particular casting director (and the director of the feature film) was looking for something very specific with certain roles. So either the actors had it when they walked in the room or they didn’t. In some cases, several of the actors had one dynamic of the character, but lacked another dynamic of the character. All good and talented actors that came into the room. But again, nothing personal. The people behind the scenes are putting together a complicated puzzle and have to make sure the pieces fit looks-wise, age-wise, type-wise. One actor was too tall. Another was too short. One didn’t look high school enough. One didn’t look nerdy enough. Our job as actors is to deliver a strong product and book the audition rooms so that we can be brought back for other projects in the future. Remember, casting directors are not just casting that one project…they are casting other projects down the line.

2) Don’t take it personal if the casting director seems “unfriendly” or “cold”. This particular casting director was literally juggling 10 different things in between each audition session. It’s not that they were cold. This casting director loves actors. It’s just that they were dealing with a myriad of things regarding the project. In between actors coming into the room, this casting director was calling one particular agency to see if they could resolve a scheduling conflict with an actor they already cast in the feature; or they were working out a deal memo; or they were calling Breakdown Services to re-release a breakdown for another character; or they were on the phone with the director and producer of the feature film to let them know that they might be losing one of the lead actors due to a scheduling conflict.

3) Make strong choices. The actors that booked the room made strong choices and delivered a product. One actor asked me before we entered the room, “What do you guys want to see from me?” I answered, “Do what you prepared and they’ll give you a re-direct if necessary.” Don’t ask or figure out what the casting director wants to see from you. Create your product and deliver it. Show us what you created and how you brought this character to life. Give us the answer. Believe in what you created.

4) Don’t apologize. Apologizing before you start your audition, apologizing during your audition or apologizing after your audition doesn’t serve you. Apologizing leaves something in the room that doesn’t need to be in there. Apologizing leaves this icky feeling/energy in the room. Once you apologize, it gives us an “out” to not root for you. Once you apologize, you’re shaping our viewpoint of what you’re about to present to us or what you just presented to us. Don’t apologize. Do your best and let us have our own opinion and viewpoint about your audition. Don’t apologize for us and leave us with an apology.

5) Casting directors are rooting for you. They want you to be the answer!

This was a great experience and I hope to do it again!